Software Freedom and Frontline Services

There are many reasons why organisations choose open source software. Sometimes Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is a key factor. Sometimes the FOSS offering is the market leader in its niche (such as Hadoop for Big Data, or WordPress for blogs). Sometimes its the particular features and qualities of the software.

However, one of the other key characteristics of FOSS is freedom, and this is emerging as an important consideration when using software to deliver key user-facing services.

"If you want to achieve greatness, stop asking for permission"

At the Open Source Open Standards conference in London on April 3rd, James Stewart from the UK Government Digital Service (GDS) stressed the importance of the permissionless character of FOSS. This enables GDS to modify government frontline services whenever there is need, or whenever an improvement can be identified. This means that services can innovate and improve continually without requiring cycles of negotiation with suppliers.

Businesses are also identifying the importance of “delivering constant value and incremental improvement” that can be delivered through participation in FOSS projects, and through permissionless modification.

While it may seem at odds with typical procurement and deployment practices, where software is used for delivering key services to customers, organisations can choose to devote resources to continual innovation and improvement (using agile processes and continuous testing) rather than more traditional models of sparse planned service upgrades. This can make the difference in crowded markets; or for public sector, react to public demand. With FOSS, continual service improvement processes can be implemented in an agile manner.

Free and Open Source Software is an enabler of permissionless innovation, so when evaluating software for frontline services, bear this in mind.

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