Open Source Phones at MWC

Mobile World Congress is running this week in Barcelona.  While it’s predicable that we’ve seen lots of Android phones, including the big unveiling of the Galaxy S5 from Samsung, I’ve found it interesting to see the coverage of the other devices powered by open source technologies.

Mozilla announced their plans for a smartphone that could retail for as little as $25. It’s based on a new system-on-chip platform that integrates a 1GHz processor, 1GB of RAM and 2GB of flash memory, and will of course be running the open source Firefox OS.  It’s very much an entry level smartphone, but the $25 price point gives real weight to Mozilla’s ambition to target the “next billion” web users in developing countries.

Ubuntu Touch is finally seeing the light of day on 2 phones, one from Chinese manufacturer Meizu and one from Spanish manufacturer Bq.  Both phones are currently sold running Android, but will ship with Ubuntu later this year.  The phones’ internals have high-end performance in mind, with the Meizu sporting an 8-core processor and 2GB of RAM, clearly chosen to deliver Ubuntu’s fabled “convergence story”.

There’s been rumours abound this year that Nokia have been planning to release an Android smartphone, and they confirmed the rumours were true at MWC, sort of.  “Nokia X” will be a fork of Android with its own app store (as well as third-party ones) and a custom interface that borrows elements from Nokia’s Asha platform and Windows Phone.  Questions were raised at the rumour mill over whether Microsoft’s takeover of Nokia’s smartphone business would prevent an Android-based Nokia being possible.  However, Microsoft’s vice-president for operating systems Joe Belfiore said “Whatever they do, we’re very supportive of them,” while Nokia’s Stephen Elop maintains that the Windows-based Lumia range is still their primary smartphone product.

A slightly more left-field offering comes in the shape of Samsung’s Gear 2 “smartwatch” running Tizen, the apparently-not-dead-after-all successor to Maemo, Meego, LiMo, and all those other Linux-based mobile operating systems that never quite made it.  The device is designed to link up to the Samsung Galaxy range of Android phones, but with the dropping of “Galaxy” from the Gear’s branding, perhaps we’ll be seeing a new brand of Tizen powered smartphones from Samsung in the future.