A new Voice in the crowd

6 Months ago, 4 journalists quit their respective jobs at the leading UK Linux magazine, Linux Format.  Today, a new magazine hit the shelves of the country’s newsagents: Linux Voice.

Linux Voice issue 1 on a shelf

Linux Voice on the shelves of a popular high-street newsagent (yes, that one)

With the same team behind it, Linux Voice has the same feel and a similar structure to old issues of Linux Format. However, Linux Voice aims to be different to other Linux publications in 3 key ways: It’s independent, so only answerable to readers; 9 months after publication, all issues will be licensed CC-BY-SA; 50% of the profits at the end of each financial year will be donated to free software projects, as chosen by the readers.

Linux Voice's Copyright notice, including an automatic re-licensing clause

Linux Voice’s Copyright notice, including an automatic re-licensing clause

By presenting itself with these key principles, Linux Voice embodies in a publication the spirit of the community it serves, which provides a compelling USP for free software fans.  On top of that, Linux Voice was able to get started thanks to a very successful crowd funding campaign on IndieGoGo, allowing the community to take a real sense of ownership.

Aside from the business model, the first issue contains some great content.  There’s a 2-page section on games for Linux, which would have been hard to fill two years ago, but is now sure to grow.  There’s a round-up of encryption tools looking at security, usability and performance, to help average users keep their data safe.  There’s a bundle of features and tutorials, including homebrew monitoring with a RaspberryPi and PGP email encryption. Plus, of course, letters from users, news, and the usual regulars you’d expect from any magazine.

I’m particularly impressed by what appears to be a series of articles about the work of some of the female pioneers of computing. Issue 1 contains a tutorial looking at the work of Ada Lovelace, and Issue 2 promises to bring us the work of Grace Hopper.  It’s great to see a publication shining the spotlight on some of the early hackers, and it’s fascinating to see how it was done before the days of IDEs, text editors, or even in some cases electricity!

For your £6 (less if you subscribe) you get 114 pages jammed with great content, plus a DVD with various linux distros and other software to play with. Well worth it in my opinion, and I look forward to Issue 2!