BBC creates HTML5 TV appliance

The BBC R&D labs have recently been busy working on a TV prototyping appliance called the egBox. The idea behind it is to create a minimum viable product of a HTML5-based TV as the base platform for experimenting with new features.

The appliance uses HTML 5, the WebM video codec, runs services using Node.js, and is being used as the basis for various technology experiments at the BBC. The  set of components used by the egBox is one that many developers will be familiar with – node, redis, socket.io, backbone.js – on top of which the developers are working on areas such as TV authentication.

What is interesting is that, while the idea is to create a minimum viable TV product as the basis of other prototypes, the nature of the egBox stack suggests lots of interesting ways to extend it. For example, as it uses Node.js, you might make use of the Webinos platform to offer apps.

At the time of writing the egBox code is not open source; however, that is the eventual plan.

The usual sticking point for any foray into TV using open source is actually working with TV services themselves. The “Smart TV” space not only has a whole raft of competing and conflicting standards, but most of the consortia operate on a paid membership basis, some even requiring signing NDAs to read the documentation; this is something I covered in a post a few years ago.

Things have improved since then, but there is still a long way to go. Ironically, a W3C standard for encrypted media content might actually be a good thing – or at least, a less-bad-thing – for open source TV, as W3C standards are royalty-free and publicly available unlike many of the specifications developed within the TV industry.

The upshot is that any open source project looking to work with a good range of TV services is likely to have to pony up some membership fees, and potentially keep some important parts of the codebase closed source to avoid issues with partners and consortia.

Still, its going to be interesting to see whats possible with the egBox.

You can find out more on the egBox over at the BBC’s R&D blog.